vendredi 18 mars 2016

Peer review article: Standardized Patient Versus Role-Play Strategies: A Comparative Study Measuring Patient-Centered Care and Safety in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Alfes, C. M. (2015). Standardized Patient Versus Role-Play Strategies: A Comparative Study Measuring Patient-Centered Care and Safety in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. Nursing Education Perspectives, 36(6), 403–405. http://doi.org/10.5480/14-1535
Small study (n=77) in psychiatric nursing, evaluating self-efficacy, knowledge and attitude. It shows there is no difference if the students follow a training with standardized patients (SP) first or with role-play first. The more important is the repetition of the training activities. The study advices to practice intensely role-play first and, at the end of the semester, to pratice some SPs activities because SPs activities are much more costly and time-consuming to organize.

Two definitions :
  • standardized patients : in the training interviews, the patient is played by an trained actor.
  • role-play : in the training interviews, the patient is played by a fellow student.
To link with :
  • (Lane & Rollnick, 2007) a review of the literature comparing the two trainings. Concludes neither SP or role-play is superior to the other. More studies needed.


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Lane, C., & Rollnick, S. (2007). The use of simulated patients and role-play in communication skills training: A review of the literature to August 2005. Patient Education and Counseling, 67(1–2), 13–20. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2007.02.011

vendredi 11 mars 2016

Peer review article : The effect of tabletop role-playing games on the creative potential and emotional creativity of Taiwanese college students

Dyson, S. B., Chang, Y.-L., Chen, H.-C., Hsiung, H.-Y., Tseng, C.-C., & Chang, J.-H. (2016). The effect of tabletop role-playing games on the creative potential and emotional creativity of Taiwanese college students. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 19, 88–96. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsc.2015.10.004


This study is based on a small treatment group (n=19) facing a small control group (n=20). It observes a positive impact of playing tabletop role-playing games on cognitive creativity (or divergent thinking). There is no significant effect observed on emotional creativity.

To link with :
  • Chung (2013): tabletop roleplayers have a higher level of creative thinking than non-players or electronic RPG players.
  • Karwowski and Soszynski (2008), who used a training activity based on RP to develop creativity.
2014 Impact Factor of this peer review journal: 1,461 (35th rank of 224 in its JCR category)
Found with an alert of Web of Science.
Modified Wikipedia page : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divergent_thinking


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Chung, T. (2013). Table-Top Role Playing Game and Creativity. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 8, 56–71. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsc.2012.06.002
Karwowski, M., & Soszynski, M. (2008). How to develop creative imagination?: Assumptions, aims and effectiveness of Role Play Training in Creativity (RPTC). Thinking Skills and Creativity, 3(2), 163–171. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tsc.2008.07.001